Faculty by Undergraduate Concentration

All history majors select a geographic region of concentration as their primary area of study: Americas and Africa, Asia and the Pacific, and Europe and the Mediterranean World. Majors are encouraged to get to know the faculty in their region of concentration as early as possible.

History majors are also encouraged to carve out their own unique thematic research pathway — religion, social movements, science and environment, and gender, to name a few — and to get to know the history faculty who specialize in those research areas.

Emily Honig
  • Title
    • Professor
  • Division Humanities Division
  • Department
    • History Department
  • Affiliations East Asian Studies, Feminist Studies Department
  • Phone
    831-459-3710 (office), 831-459-1924 (message)
  • Email
  • Office Location
    • Humanities Building 1, 332 Humanities 1
  • Office Hours Fall 2019: Weds., 2-3:45
  • Mail Stop Humanities Academic Services
  • Mailing Address
    • 1156 High Street
    • Santa Cruz CA 95064
  • Courses HIS 140C: Revolutionary China 1895-1960; HIS 194A: Gender, Class, and Sex in Shanghai; HIS 194F: Jewish Shanghai; HIS 194J: The Poor and the Everyday in Modern China; HIS 230B: Engendering China; HIS 230C: Readings in 20th-Century China; HIS 231: Historicizing the People's Republic of China

Research Interests

Gender, sexuality, and ethnicity in modern Chinese history; comparative labor history; Chicana history; nationalism and sexuality in the Third World; oral history

Biography, Education and Training

Ph.D., History Stanford University

Selected Publications

  • "Socialist Sex: The Cultural Revolution Revisited," in Modern China, 29.2, April 2003:153-75.
  • "Maoist Mappings of Gender: Reassessing the Red Guards," in Chinese Femininities/Chinese Masculinities, editors Susan Brownell and Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002.
  • "Iron Girls Revisited: Gender and the Politics of Work in the Cultural Revolution," in Barbara Gutwisle and Gail Henderson, eds., Re-Drawing the Boundaries of Work, Households, and Gender, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000.
  • Creating Chinese Ethnicity: Subei People in Shanghai, 1850-1980, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1992.
  • Personal Voices: Chinese Women in the 1980's, with Gail Hershatter, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1988.
  • Sisters and Strangers: Women in the Shanghai Cotton Mills, 1919-1949, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1986.